Getting ready for coaching

Written by Matt Somers on . Posted in Coaching principles

Getting ready for coachingOver recent posts we’ve seen that in order to turn more potential into high performance we needed to minimise the sources of interference which work against that happening.

But this presupposes that people come to us wanting to produce high performance, and this isn’t necessarily so.

If you’ve been asked or employed to provide some one-to-one coaching to a member of the executive team you can probably assume that they will be motivated to undertake some coaching with you. It follows that they are likely to give honest answers to your questions, to listen to your ideas and suggestions and to act on the things you’ve discussed between meetings and phone calls.

But in trying to bring coaching into general play; to position it as a management approach rather than a discrete intervention, you might find conditions less favourable. In some ways coaching has become a term cheapened by misuse and because of this you may encounter a certain amount of resistance. This can range from the mildly apathetic to the downright hostile. It all seems bizarre, given that we’re simply trying to help people so let’s look at the common reasons for this resistance.

  • Management is up to something
  • Coaching is for poor performers
  • I’m okay where I am

Management is up to something

Okay, it’s a cynical view but is hardly surprising given the way some management teams behave. People have had change initiatives thrown at them for years now and most of them have amounted to very little. If this has been people’s experience then it’s small wonder that coaching is greeted with little enthusiasm. People can tell when you’ve been away on a course and been ‘got at’.  They also know that if they keep their heads down then after a few days you’ll probably go back to ‘normal’.

Coaching is for poor performers

Nobody likes to be thought of as needing special lessons, but all too often coaching is presented this way. A strong desire to improve performance in the organisation gets mutated into ‘I’m being coached, so I must be doing something wrong’ in the mind of the individual.

In my experience this particular worry is most easily countered by pointing to the worlds of entertainment and sport where coaching is a vital ingredient whatever the level of current performance, Great sportspeople and entertainers welcome regular and intensive coaching even though their level of performance is already astonishing by most standards.

By mindful though that sporting analogies and so on can seem a little tiresome for some.

I’m okay where I am

An overzealous approach to coaching can make it seem as if we want everybody to be Superman. Some people resist coaching because they’re quite content where they are and do not want to actively pursue a promotion or a change of role. Great! That’s fine but let’s make sure that people realise that coaching isn’t just about climbing the greasy pole. We can coach to help people feel less threatened by change. We can coach to help people get back to the parts of their job they once really enjoyed. We can coach to help people find a work-life balance. Coaching is a way of taking the next step and as such it has applications throughout working life and, I think, should be made available to all. However, let’s also respect people’s right not to be coached if that is what they would prefer. To do so goes a long way to establishing the credibility of coaching and building the trusting relationships so vital to its success. In time even the most reluctant of people will try coaching when they have something in mind they’d like to achieve.

About 

Matt Somers is the UK’s leading trainer of managers as coaches. His coaching skills training programmes, books, articles and seminars have helped thousands of managers achieve outstanding results through their people.

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