Posts Tagged ‘Business’

What they said about the Coaching at Work course

Written by Matt Somers on . Posted in Coaching Skills Training

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Are you really going to write that on your evaluation?

Are you really going to write that on your evaluation?

Not long ago I posted some information about our forthcoming coaching skills training event – Coaching at Work.

 In case you were thinking of attending, I thought you might like to see some feedback from our last couple of events:

I have learnt lots from this course which I can use in both work place and personal life. I believe coaching is applicable to everyone regardless on level and responsibilities. The course kept me interested at all times. Lots to go away and think about.

Lindsey Mitchell, HSBC

I have been to many courses – a bit of an addict really – but I can honestly say I didn’t experience one boring minute. Really outstanding as it feels fresh and surprising even to someone who’s been to loads of courses/workshops & it proved to me that I could change/expand. I really would recommend this course 100%. It can only help & certainly cannot hurt any manager appropriate to the organisation and culture.

What they said about the Coaching at Work course

Written by Matt Somers on . Posted in Coaching Skills for Managers

Tagged: / / /

Are you really going to write that on your evaluation?

Are you really going to write that on your evaluation?

Not long ago I posted some information about our forthcoming coaching skills training event – Coaching at Work.

 In case you were thinking of attending, I thought you might like to see some feedback from our last couple of events:

I have learnt lots from this course which I can use in both work place and personal life. I believe coaching is applicable to everyone regardless on level and responsibilities. The course kept me interested at all times. Lots to go away and think about.

Lindsey Mitchell, HSBC

I have been to many courses – a bit of an addict really – but I can honestly say I didn’t experience one boring minute. Really outstanding as it feels fresh and surprising even to someone who’s been to loads of courses/workshops & it proved to me that I could change/expand. I really would recommend this course 100%. It can only help & certainly cannot hurt any manager appropriate to the organisation and culture.

Marjorie Newson, British Library

I have thoroughly enjoyed all aspects of the course and would recommend anyone concerned with coaching to attend.

Having had no coaching experience I found the pace of the course ideal.

Ken Bell, Lucite International

The mix and match between “classroom” and “physical” activities was great as it brought the theory to life in a fun way. Thoroughly enjoyed the course, I have a lot to practice. Thank you.

Lynn Judd, Scottish & Southern Energy

Approached the course with some trepidation but far exceeded my expectations. A refreshing change from other training programmes. Will definitely put the skills and knowledge into practice. Thank you

Allison Young, University of Sunderland

Don’t know what you’re doing to our member of staff but she practically ran into work this morning, clicked her heels and said ‘bring it on’…Fantastic….Thanks……Chris

Chris Reed, Three Rivers Housing

Very useful and interesting course. Rare to attend a 2 day course which maintains your interest throughout the whole course. Learnt some techniques which I will be able to use and benefit from at work.

Kevin Oxborough, Yorkshire Homes

Our next course runs at Blackwell Grange, Darlington on the 18th-19th October 2011.

For full details and for special bonuses for booking and paying online visit

http://www.mattsomers.com/pages/open-programmes.htm

Spaces are limited so please act quickly to secure your place.

Go now to:

http://www.mattsomers.com/pages/open-programmes.htm

The people you just read about are glad they did and you will be too!

Look forward to seeing you there.

Coaching & Communication 3

Written by Matt Somers on . Posted in Coaching Skills for Managers

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In posts 1 and 2 we explored six communication styles and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each:

  • Tells
  • Sells
  • Tests
  • Consults
  • Joins
  • Delegates

So how does all this relate to coaching and where would we place coaching on the spectrum. Some argue that coaching is all about empowering others and so must sit ‘right of centre’ towards delegation. However, we can also see that perhaps coaching doesn’t belong to this range of alternatives at all as it almost represents a philosophy of communication rather than a style. In many ways coaching is a means of adopting the advantages of each of the other styles whilst minimizing the disadvantages.

Placing coaching on the spectrum

Placing coaching on the spectrum

Good coaches don’t fear loss of control as they know that the people they coach will have formulated their plans and ideas in their presence. Thus the coach has the ability to warn against a certain course of action if it is against the rules or likely to cause problems. Also, we’ve seen that coaching is an effective way for managers to build trust in their teams and so they can resort to Tell when the situation demands it without worrying about the team being uncooperative or becoming disillusioned.

So far we have considered the merits of various communication styles in a general context. What about when we need to communicate with another to help them develop?

It seems that Tell is dominant here and perhaps this is because most of us were conditioned to learn in this way at school. We would sit in rows of desks while the teacher would tell us what we needed to do and how to do it and lessons would consist of being told what we needed to know. But this doesn’t always work. Try explaining to someone how to do up a tie or lace a training shoe without showing them – it’s almost impossible. To do so requires us firstly to understand exactly the process that needs to be done and then to find the language to convey that process to another person in a way they can understand.

The modern world of work is changing so fast that we can no longer be certain that the ways and methods we used to become successful will be valid for the next generation. Solving today’s problems with yesterday’s solutions is a big risk.

Furthermore, people don’t retain a great deal of learning when they have only ever been told what to do. How many managers have you heard yelling, “If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a thousand times!”, or “How many times do I have to tell you?”

Coaching presents a way of dealing with these problems as it is concerned with drawing our rather than putting in and thus enables people to learn in their own way and at their own speed. In this way we get learning and development that sticks in the same way as learning to swim or to ride a bicycle.

There’s an old Chinese proverb which, roughly translated, states:

“Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand”

Coaching is the best way to involve people in their own learning.